Discussion:
Let’s just say it: The Republicans are the problem
(too old to reply)
Snit
2019-02-10 19:18:14 UTC
Permalink
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.

It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.

We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.

The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.

When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.

“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.

Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.

The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”

And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----


An excellent and very true article.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.


Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-10 20:01:16 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 12:18:14 -0700, Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party.
Wouldn't be surprised. They're certainly not Americans.
max headroom
2019-02-10 21:00:50 UTC
Permalink
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion piece?
Just Wondering
2019-02-10 21:24:22 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party.
I doubt they are bona fide members of the Communist Party.
But without a doubt there are many Democratic Party congress
critters whose political philosophy is compatible with Marxism.
Snit
2019-02-10 21:31:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Just Wondering
Post by Snit
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party.
I doubt they are bona fide members of the Communist Party.
But without a doubt there are many Democratic Party congress
critters whose political philosophy is compatible with Marxism.
A claim you will never back. A claim many on the right make because they
have no idea on solutions... so much so they feel the need to spew such
nonsense and to deny problems even exist.

You prove me right again.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
Snit
2019-02-10 21:28:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
max headroom
2019-02-10 22:02:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion piece?
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Snit lies again.

Will she continue mumbling to herself? Let's watch....
Snit
2019-02-10 22:28:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major
party figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than
40 years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that
the core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose
solutions that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is
simply untenable when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and
debt, on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been
the force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use
of partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP
leaders have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending,
kowtowing to their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of
problems and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit
their ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the
Great Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes
insisted on obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus
fulfilling Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their
own proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that
came within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor,
“I liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own
resolution, solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold
Republicans demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
And when called out on it he freaked out again. LOL!
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-11 00:01:19 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:28:55 -0700, Snit
The thread JUST began and Snit is already freaking out and replying to
himself.

Interesting.
Steve Carroll
2019-02-11 00:15:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Klaus Schadenfreude
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 14:28:55 -0700, Snit
The thread JUST began and Snit is already freaking out and replying to
himself.
Interesting.
That's what Snit Sock Scout does when he gets humiliated. He always creates a new identity, starts a trolling thread so he can claim he didn't do it. Don't blame me it was my left hand... and then he replies to himself with his right hand. Xfce is likely my second favorite DE and the only one I suggest to Linux converts. Primary interface is Budgie, though. A great search feature is all you want after you install it.

That lame duck update system failed over and over again.
--
Puppy Videos!


http://www.5z8.info/mercenary_w5v9dl_open.exe
Jonas Eklundh Communication
max headroom
2019-02-11 03:08:08 UTC
Permalink
The thread JUST began and Snit is already freaking out and replying to himself.
Interesting.
Not any more. It's what we've come to expect from Snit-- no exchange of ideas, just her preaching.
Snit
2019-02-11 06:35:32 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major
party figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than
40 years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that
the core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose
solutions that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is
simply untenable when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and
debt, on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been
the force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use
of partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP
leaders have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending,
kowtowing to their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of
problems and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit
their ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the
Great Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes
insisted on obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus
fulfilling Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their
own proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that
came within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor,
“I liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own
resolution, solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold
Republicans demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.

Even he notes this is old... and I think we all know it has gotten even
worse over the last couple years.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
max headroom
2019-02-11 15:24:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion piece?
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Snit lies again.
Will she continue mumbling to herself? Let's watch....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.
And she doesn't disappoint us. Well, any more than her continued refusals to respond to direct
refutations of her bullshit have disappointed us. It's understandable-- she's afraid to respond
directly because it has repeatedly resulted in severe ass burns. Apparently she now sees herself as
a narrator in some kind of Greek tragedy, standing stage left, whispering to an imaginary audience.
Post by Snit
Even he notes this is old... and I think we all know it has gotten even
worse over the last couple years.
Not any more. It's what we've come to expect from Snit-- no exchange of ideas, just her preaching.

Will she explain why she posted an old WAPO opinion from 2012, or will she continue her imaginary
narration to an imaginary audience? I think I know which way the smart money's going....
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-11 15:55:23 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 23:35:32 -0700, Snit
Post by Snit
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.
So claims Snit, yet Snit continues to respond to himself, crying, over
and over again. LOL




Learn more about Snit:

More on Snit's trolling
http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snit.html

Over 100 people ridicule Snit
http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snitlist.html

Typical Snit trolling methods
http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snitLieMethods.html
Snit
2019-02-11 00:16:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus saw this and freaked out.

Conservatives must not own mirrors.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
Steve Carroll
2019-02-11 07:31:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus saw this and freaked out.
Conservatives must not own mirrors.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.
They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.
http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
mattb created at least 20 KVMS in the last year or so. Without Linux that would not be possible. bigdog's posts are nothing but a meaningless brain dump. bigdog is commonly seen insisting "GOOGLE HAS NOTHING" when it comes to details on a website where it is there multiple times... but bigdog is just too dull-witted and/or distracted to discern any information he sees.

Now mattb on the other end of the shit doesn't matter. All that matters is bigdog gets to deliver the payload. So how to deal with this? Don't pay attention the moron. Reason isn't part of contrivance and never was planned to be. Do you have a Network+ certification? Protected code is totally screwing up your program.

I think it is already over.

-
I Left My Husband & Daughter At Home And THIS happened!
http://www.5z8.info/php-start_GPS_tracking-user_f8h9lv_-OPEN-WEBCAM---START-RECORD--
http://bit.ly/2oNYRgv
https://goo.gl/Fho5Nq
Jonas Eklundh Communication AB
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-11 12:56:41 UTC
Permalink
On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 17:16:30 -0700, Snit
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus saw this and freaked out.
LOL All Klaus said was

"Wouldn't be surprised. They're certainly not Americans."

But Klaus also noted Snit's IMMEDIATE replying to himself, which
ALWAYS indicates Snit's mental breakdown and frantic surrender,
without exception.

Snit is VERY predictable.




More on Snit's trolling
http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snit.html

Over 100 people ridicule Snit
http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snitlist.html

Typical Snit trolling methods
http://www.cosmicpenguin.com/snitLieMethods.html
Snit
2019-02-11 13:58:28 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus saw this and freaked out.
Conservatives must not own mirrors.
Klaus freaked out again.
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-11 14:03:05 UTC
Permalink
Snit, crying, tries again to convince himself, as predicted. I wonder
if it's working?

"Laugh laugh laugh laugh."
-Lee Harrison 1957-2012, RIP
Snit
2019-02-11 16:13:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
max headroom
2019-02-11 18:19:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion
piece?
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Snit lies again.
Will she continue mumbling to herself? Let's watch....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.
And she doesn't disappoint us. Well, any more than her continued refusals to respond to direct
refutations of her bullshit have disappointed us. It's understandable-- she's afraid to respond
directly because it has repeatedly resulted in severe ass burns. Apparently she now sees herself
as a narrator in some kind of Greek tragedy, standing stage left, whispering to an imaginary
audience.
Post by Snit
Even he notes this is old... and I think we all know it has gotten even
worse over the last couple years.
Not any more. It's what we've come to expect from Snit-- no exchange of ideas, just her
preaching.
Will she explain why she posted an old WAPO opinion from 2012, or will she continue her imaginary
narration to an imaginary audience? I think I know which way the smart money's going....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Easy money. Let's watch her psychosis play itself out....
Snit
2019-02-11 20:11:56 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
Steve Carroll
2019-02-11 21:19:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.
They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.
http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
You can say I am a monkey wrench for all I care. These posts are clearly not automated, they are made by a glue sniffing stalker with a sick agenda who has way too much time on his hands. What is the Earth coming to when a Klaus Schadenfreude flood post can not get any notice... Times change. I think the idea of a website is getting a little dated.

Seriously, those of you who troll are not able to manage yourselves anymore. You wishing for something does not make it true.

--
Do not click this link!!
http://youtu.be/0ZNxaaKD7-c
http://www.5z8.info/killallimmigrants_j6f7mm_gruesome-gunshot-wounds
http://www.5z8.info/boobs_j0v3qo_dont-just-drizzle
Jonas Eklundh Communication AB
max headroom
2019-02-12 02:01:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion
piece?
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Snit lies again.
Will she continue mumbling to herself? Let's watch....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.
And she doesn't disappoint us. Well, any more than her continued refusals to respond to direct
refutations of her bullshit have disappointed us. It's understandable-- she's afraid to respond
directly because it has repeatedly resulted in severe ass burns. Apparently she now sees
herself as a narrator in some kind of Greek tragedy, standing stage left, whispering to an
imaginary audience.
Post by Snit
Even he notes this is old... and I think we all know it has gotten even
worse over the last couple years.
Not any more. It's what we've come to expect from Snit-- no exchange of ideas, just her
preaching.
Will she explain why she posted an old WAPO opinion from 2012, or will she continue her
imaginary narration to an imaginary audience? I think I know which way the smart money's
going....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Easy money. Let's watch her psychosis play itself out....
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
Snit continues to lie like a rug. More medication is indicated.
Snit
2019-02-12 02:48:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
Max read this and insisted on making baseless accusations that have
nothing to do with the topic.

A shame he has no counter.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
max headroom
2019-02-12 06:50:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion
piece?
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Snit lies again.
Will she continue mumbling to herself? Let's watch....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.
And she doesn't disappoint us. Well, any more than her continued refusals to respond to
direct refutations of her bullshit have disappointed us. It's understandable-- she's afraid
to respond directly because it has repeatedly resulted in severe ass burns. Apparently she
now sees herself as a narrator in some kind of Greek tragedy, standing stage left, whispering
to an imaginary audience.
Post by Snit
Even he notes this is old... and I think we all know it has gotten even
worse over the last couple years.
Not any more. It's what we've come to expect from Snit-- no exchange of ideas, just her
preaching.
Will she explain why she posted an old WAPO opinion from 2012, or will she continue her
imaginary narration to an imaginary audience? I think I know which way the smart money's
going....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Easy money. Let's watch her psychosis play itself out....
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
Snit continues to lie like a rug. More medication is indicated.
Max read this and insisted on making baseless accusations that have
nothing to do with the topic.
A shame he has no counter.
Snit can't stop herself from further embarrassing herself. Maybe she's pretending to be Dr. Sheldon
Cooper pretending to be Mr. Spock.
Steve Carroll
2019-02-12 06:55:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit reaches deep into the archives of WAPO's Greatest Hits for a seven year old opinion
piece?
Max Headroom responded to say this freaked him out.
Snit lies again.
Will she continue mumbling to herself? Let's watch....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over this.
And she doesn't disappoint us. Well, any more than her continued refusals to respond to
direct refutations of her bullshit have disappointed us. It's understandable-- she's afraid
to respond directly because it has repeatedly resulted in severe ass burns. Apparently she
now sees herself as a narrator in some kind of Greek tragedy, standing stage left, whispering
to an imaginary audience.
Post by Snit
Even he notes this is old... and I think we all know it has gotten even
worse over the last couple years.
Not any more. It's what we've come to expect from Snit-- no exchange of ideas, just her
preaching.
Will she explain why she posted an old WAPO opinion from 2012, or will she continue her
imaginary narration to an imaginary audience? I think I know which way the smart money's
going....
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Easy money. Let's watch her psychosis play itself out....
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
Snit continues to lie like a rug. More medication is indicated.
Max read this and insisted on making baseless accusations that have
nothing to do with the topic.
A shame he has no counter.
Snit can't stop herself from further embarrassing herself. Maybe she's pretending to be Dr. Sheldon
Cooper pretending to be Mr. Spock.
If you have 'file.txt' open in a user space program such as gedit and mattb wants to change its name to 'windows.txt' via a GUI menu item, Klaus Schadenfreude's method might be useful. Seriously, those of you who troll are not able to control Klaus Schadenfreude anymore.

mattb wants to punish us: If mattb can't be the focus here then his flooding crap will. You can say I am Madonna for all I care. At one point, he said an online denizen was "obsessing" over him, which was identified as mentioning any of his socks. He makes false accusation to multiple groups of people who are mere civilians, but that's a stuck up jerk for you. What Klaus Schadenfreude and I care about isn't a factor. The fabricator does it every time. Then the torrent begins. Because the wimp just has to run to other groups to get the attention he's not getting here.



--
I Left My Husband & Daughter At Home And THIS happened
http://www.5z8.info/how-to-build-a-bomb_h2o1be_peepshow
http://bit.ly/2oNYRgv
http://tinyurl.com/gsleb4p
Jonas Eklundh Communication AB
Steve Carroll
2019-02-12 09:00:20 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Max Headroom continues to freak out.
Max read this and insisted on making baseless accusations that have
nothing to do with the topic.
A shame he has no counter.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.
They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.
http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
No one here has ever read my script, much less found a bug; still, in the back of my mind, I'm thinking, "I have dark thoughts in the middle of the night", a secret I share with you only now. This is something the mainstream media never covers.

It was Jesus Christ who flooded bigdog's site thousands of times and pretended he did not do it.



-
Top Six Ways Jesus Christ Trolls!!
http://tinyurl.com/gsleb4p
Jonas Eklundh Communication AB
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-11 21:02:56 UTC
Permalink
Max Headroom [..]
...freaks Snit out so much, Snit can't even respond directly to him
any more.

Interesting.
max headroom
2019-02-12 00:21:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by Klaus Schadenfreude
Max Headroom [..]
...freaks Snit out so much, Snit can't even respond directly to him
any more.
Interesting.
Quite amusing, don't you think?
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-12 12:04:54 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 16:21:07 -0800, "max headroom"
Post by max headroom
Post by Klaus Schadenfreude
Max Headroom [..]
...freaks Snit out so much, Snit can't even respond directly to him
any more.
Interesting.
Quite amusing, don't you think?
Any time he can't handle it any more... when things get too rough.....
when the teddy bear comes out.... when he has one of his "attacks" and
Anne has to administer some warm essential lavender oil on his upper
lip...

... when he freaks out so much he begins replying to himself....

That's some funny stuff.
Snit
2019-02-12 02:47:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom continues to freak out over how he cannot refute this. He also
is deeply bothered by how things have gotten worse for the Republicans
since the article was written.
Klaus and Max Headroom read that and freaked out.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-12 11:57:16 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 19:47:24 -0700, Snit
Snit continues to freak out by replying to himself. Interesting!
Steve Carroll
2019-02-12 12:23:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Klaus Schadenfreude
On Mon, 11 Feb 2019 19:47:24 -0700, Snit
Snit continues to freak out by replying to himself. Interesting!
LOL! Right, Avenging 'Super Troll' Angel is looking to retail an API variable, which anyone can get in 5 seconds, that is looped over as it removes nodes. If he wasn't so slow he would figure out how screwed up he proves himself to be ;) Avenging 'Super Troll' Angel has yet to show how Scrivener does anything above the LCD on Linux. At one point, Avenging 'Super Troll' Angel said a legitimate denizen was "obsessing" over him, which was shown to be merely responding to any name he uses. What do you get out of lying? Despite all the crowing Avenging 'Super Troll' Angel has done on this topic, the 'SEO Consultant' does not know how to do this. It literally takes a couple seconds to select a range and 'print' it.

LOL! How did Avenging 'Super Troll' Angel get _so_ self-centered he concludes everything is about his trolling?? Nobody gets it, I barely understand it.

--
My Snoring Solution

https://groups.google.com/forum/#!topic/comp.os.linux.development.apps/G2-ZXYAEyIM
Loading Image...
Jonas Eklundh Communication AB
Snit
2019-02-11 16:13:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus saw this and felt the need to lash out.
Snit
2019-02-12 15:24:37 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus freaked out again and blamed me.

LOL!

Remember when right wingers used to pretend they backed personal
responsibility. Ah, the good ol’ days.
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-12 20:39:20 UTC
Permalink
Does your anger prevent you from carrying on a conversation with
normal people?
max headroom
2019-02-12 23:57:33 UTC
Permalink
Post by Klaus Schadenfreude
Does your anger prevent you from carrying on a conversation with
normal people?
Her anger prevents normal people from carrying on conversations with Snit.
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-13 01:36:42 UTC
Permalink
On Tue, 12 Feb 2019 15:57:33 -0800, "max headroom"
Post by max headroom
Post by Klaus Schadenfreude
Does your anger prevent you from carrying on a conversation with
normal people?
Her anger prevents normal people from carrying on conversations with Snit.
Ain't that the truth! LOL

It's understandable that Snit cries when he has to respond to other
people-- that's why he responds to himself, hoping to end the
conversation before it begins.
Snit
2019-02-12 15:24:36 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus freaked out again.
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-12 20:38:06 UTC
Permalink
Wouldn't be easier for you just take notes so you can remember which
lies you're spreading today?
Snit
2019-02-12 21:16:44 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus responded by begging for attention.
Klaus Schadenfreude
2019-02-13 00:28:45 UTC
Permalink
Snit is STILL Running from Kamala's Dead Babies.

Hey, that might be a good name for a band!
Snit
2019-02-12 21:16:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Klaus responded speaking of his anger.
Snit
2019-02-13 01:31:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143
-----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the McCarthyite
playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost complete lack of
condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or other major party
figures, including the remaining presidential candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than 40
years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that the
core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around” are the
traditional refuges for an American news media intent on proving its
lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality and
neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose solutions
that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is simply untenable
when one side is so far out of reach.
....
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and debt,
on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been the
force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use of
partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP leaders
have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending, kowtowing to
their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of problems
and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit their
ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the Great
Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes insisted on
obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth — thus fulfilling
Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their own
proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that came
within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor, Sen.
Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra Klein: “I
liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own resolution,
solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold Republicans
demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Max Headroom responded with fear and anger.

Not surprising.
--
Personal attacks from those who troll show their own insecurity. They
cannot use reason to show the message to be wrong so they try to feel
somehow superior by attacking the messenger.

They cling to their attacks and ignore the message time and time again.

http://youtu.be/H4NW-Cqh308
max headroom
2019-02-13 06:29:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
Post by max headroom
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republicans-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.caeab8b95143...
Snit can't stop herself from further embarrassing herself. Maybe she's pretending to be Dr.
Sheldon Cooper pretending to be Mr. Spock.
Max Headroom responded with fear and anger.
Not surprising.
What's not surprising is Snit's continued lying.
Avenging Angel
2019-02-13 12:21:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by Snit
https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/lets-just-say-it-the-republican
s-are-the-problem/2012/04/27/gIQAxCVUlT_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_te
rm=.caeab8b95143 -----
Rep. Allen West, a Florida Republican, was recently captured on video
asserting that there are “78 to 81” Democrats in Congress who are
members of the Communist Party. Of course, it’s not unusual for some
renegade lawmaker from either side of the aisle to say something
outrageous. What made West’s comment — right out of the
McCarthyite playbook of the 1950s — so striking was the almost
complete lack of condemnation from Republican congressional leaders or
other major party figures, including the remaining presidential
candidates.
It’s not that the GOP leadership agrees with West; it is that such
extreme remarks and views are now taken for granted.
We have been studying Washington politics and Congress for more than
40 years, and never have we seen them this dysfunctional. In our past
writings, we have criticized both parties when we believed it was
warranted. Today, however, we have no choice but to acknowledge that
the core of the problem lies with the Republican Party.
The GOP has become an insurgent outlier in American politics. It is
ideologically extreme; scornful of compromise; unmoved by conventional
understanding of facts, evidence and science; and dismissive of the
legitimacy of its political opposition.
When one party moves this far from the mainstream, it makes it nearly
impossible for the political system to deal constructively with the
country’s challenges.
“Both sides do it” or “There is plenty of blame to go around”
are the traditional refuges for an American news media intent on
proving its lack of bias, while political scientists prefer generality
and neutrality when discussing partisan polarization. Many self-styled
bipartisan groups, in their search for common ground, propose
solutions that move both sides to the center, a strategy that is
simply untenable when one side is so far out of reach.
...
On financial stabilization and economic recovery, on deficits and
debt, on climate change and health-care reform, Republicans have been
the force behind the widening ideological gaps and the strategic use
of partisanship. In the presidential campaign and in Congress, GOP
leaders have embraced fanciful policies on taxes and spending,
kowtowing to their party’s most strident voices.
Republicans often dismiss nonpartisan analyses of the nature of
problems and the impact of policies when those assessments don’t fit
their ideology. In the face of the deepest economic downturn since the
Great Depression, the party’s leaders and their outside acolytes
insisted on obeisance to a supply-side view of economic growth —
thus fulfilling Norquist’s pledge — while ignoring contrary
considerations.
The results can border on the absurd: In early 2009, several of the
eight Republican co-sponsors of a bipartisan health-care reform plan
dropped their support; by early 2010, the others had turned on their
own proposal so that there would be zero GOP backing for any bill that
came within a mile of Obama’s reform initiative. As one co-sponsor,
Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), told The Washington Post’s Ezra
Klein: “I liked it because it was bipartisan. I wouldn’t have
voted for it.”
And seven Republican co-sponsors of a Senate resolution to create a
debt-reduction panel voted in January 2010 against their own
resolution, solely to keep it from getting to the 60-vote threshold
Republicans demanded and thus denying the president a seeming victory.
-----
An excellent and very true article.
Just like the Juden, ya? What is your Final Solution for them?

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